Courtmacsherry is teaming with wildlife, surrounded by walks and tucked into the waters edge making it a haven of adventure. Whether you’re a serious hillwalker, a weekend walker or just a casual stroller, we have the route for you!

If it’s bird watching you want, Courtmacsherry is a must. The sheltered harbour of Courtmacsherry provides a sense of calm for the birdwatcher and provides shelter for boats and birds alike. The mudflats are a bird-watcher’s paradise. The bay is recognised as a Special Area of Conservation. The trees planted all those years ago by the Earl of Shannon also attract various species.

Another local fisherman. Photo credit: Kieran Boyle

There is an abundance of information available on walking and birdwatching in Courtmacsherry. Various publications are available in bookshops and many of our local routes have been documented. Our local businesses have some free information.  We have referenced many articles here and if you think we left anything out please let us know. Enjoy the wonderful wild outdoors in Courtmacsherry.

Courtmacsherry village is fortunate to have a tennis court located in the centre of the village, opposite the Big Tree. Courtmacsherry also has a beautifully maintained playground with gorgeous water views at the entrance to the village.

Walks in Courtmacsherry

There are many walks for the young, old and the adventurous!

Courtmacsherry. Photo credit: Pat Callahan

The architecture of Courtmacsherry (PDF) is distinct in the area. A stroll through the village will allow visitors to soak up the atmosphere, get their bearings and familiarise themselves with our local hostelries. Without ever leaving sea level, walk past the old Garda Station (now Peter Wolstenhome’s ceramic gallery), the Coastguard cottages and various period residences and buildings. The Courtmacsherry Hotel was once the summer residence of the nobility and the Church of Ireland was built as a residence for the governess. The whole village is picture-book beautiful and filled with history. The buildings on one side of the road and the breathtaking, uninterrupted views on the other are gorgeous. Walk all the way to the beach or further on into the woods.

Seven Heads walk. Photo credit: David Reilly

Situated on the picturesque West Cork coastline, the Seven Heads Peninsula extends from Timoleague village through Courtmacsherry, around the rugged cliffs and shoreline towards Dunworley Bay and on to Barryscove, Ardgehane and Ballinglanna. It is a 42.5km looped walk and luckily there are lots of smaller sections that are well documented and very worthwhile to do. Most walkers start out from the car park, which overlooks the small strand in Courtmacsherry village. The trail begins by winding through the woods. It is filled with bluebells in the spring and carpeted in leaves during autumn. The sea is visible between the beech trees, and you can hear the birds and waves on the rocks below. Along the walkway there are  paths that lead to small coves.

The Bluebell Walk

Woodpoint Bluebells. Photo credit: Mary Cahalane

The Bluebell Walk, incorporating the bluebells and the wishing well, is suitable for all. At the right time of the year the views are breathtaking but the walk itself is always magical. Walk past the Courtmacsherry Hotel to get on the trail and enjoy the adventure! A short picturesque walk, it is suitable for everyone.

The Fuchsia Walk

Fuchsia flower. Photo credit: David Reilly

The fuchsia walk is longer but not too challenging. Especially in the summer, this walk is by far one of the most popular routes with fuchsia hedge all along the way in vibrant colours of reds, purples, and whites. You can follow the walk clockwise to the point of the wood, where you continue on through fields which will be signposted for you. Or you can go anti-clockwise. Begin by going to the Church of Ireland. If heading into the village from the hotel, turn left up the hill and take the first left turn which leads up to Ramsey Hill. The fuchsia walk sign should be right in front of you.

Abbeymahon-Courtmacsherry Walk

Abbeymahon Abbey. Photo credit: John Armagh

This is an easy walk about 7.5km. It follows both roads and woodland paths. Take your time and take in the views of Courtmacsherry Bay. It is worth the effort for not only the views but for the architecture. From the pier, the old Coast Guard Station can be seen behind the village. The largest fortified Coast Guard Station in Ireland, it was built about 1869 and torched by IRA volunteers in 1922. Leaving the pier, turning right, we pass the old Railway Station. Make sure you look out for Abbeymahon, one of the oldest structures in the area and predating the nearby Timoleague Abbey. Sometime before 1272, Cistercian monks moved from their first house, at Aghmanister, near Timoleague, to Abbeymahon, where they remained until the monastery was suppressed in 1537. After viewing the ruins and ancient graves walk back to the village.

Courtmacsherry & Broad Strand Walk

Sign for Broad Strand

There is another walk that is 12km and takes you along Broadstrand beach. You also get to see the monument to our Antarctic Explorer Patrick Keohane.  It takes about 2.5 hours over back roads, field path and beach. (Thanks to Damien Enright for the info. He also has a book on walks in the area.) This walk has great variety.  You can see the history of the architecture, the picture postcard village, woodland, the beach with the beautiful shore birds. Along the way you will come upon the memorial to Antarctic explorer, Patsy Keohane and see a Mass Rock.

The Courtmacsherry Railway Line Walk

Photo credit: Copyright Jonathan Thacker and licensed for reuse under this Creative Commons Licence.

There is also a lovely walk that follows the Bay. It is flat and safe (there is a path) and easy for families with small children and bikes. The route follows the old railway line. As you leave the village look to your right for the estuary but don’t forget to look to the left for the farmland and ancient ruins. It is an easy walk and on return to Courtmacsherry, you can stop at the Community Playground.

Beaches

Dunworley Beach. Photo credit: Mike Brown Photography

Courtmacsherry strand is in the village and Woodpoint, Broadstrand, Blindstrand and Dunworley are all close by. Well worth popping into the community shop to pick up supplies! Not all the beaches have services but that adds to the charm. Go prepared for a day of adventure. Pack a picnic and head to one of the many coves and bathing pools and enjoy a day at the beach in West Cork.

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